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Forum posts for Donairs?

Posted by jessie on May 09, 2007
turkey!

that is what i have been told anyways...

Posted by Miguel on May 09, 2007
Turkey I would think.

Posted by Palmer on May 10, 2007
Iceland?

Posted by bryan on May 10, 2007
The independent republic of Donairia.

Posted by phduffy on May 10, 2007
Well, the reason I ask this, is because an American on a board mentioned opening a Canadian restaurant in the states, with Maple Syrup, Poutine, and Donairs.

I asked "Why Donairs" and was informed that they're Canadian. Or this American thought so anyways. So I looked into it.

And apparently, "Donner Kebabs" are Turkish, while "Donairs" actually are a Canadian variant. Which were started in Halifax, and are Huge over there. (If you know someone from Halifax or the Maritimes, ask them about it).

However, despite this, I still don't think that most Canadians would think of "Donairs" as Canadian food.

Although, I'd be happy to take it.

Posted by Palmer on May 10, 2007
So what's the difference between the donair kebab and the donair? Is it the meat? Is it the contents of the thing?

Posted by jessie on May 10, 2007
i win! is there a prize?? is the prize a donair?? if it is you can just keep it...

Posted by Nerhael on May 10, 2007
Um...what?

You in fact don't win. :) As he said, Donairs are a Canadian variant of a Turkish dish called a Donner Kebab.

You lose!!!

Posted by Miguel on May 10, 2007
EL WRONGO PETE

those Halifax Donairs are just a variation of the original donairs, and there are different ways of eating them across the world. It doesn't make the donair any more Canadian than Pho or Pad Thai which is served differently here than in Thailand.

Just like Hot Dogs are served in wildly different ways across the world, but most people would still probably identify them as an American creation, or Pizza as an Italian creation.

So because a few hundred thousand people in Halifax really, really enjoy Donairs with a special sauce, all of sudden it's a Canadian staple on par with poutine, salmon, tortiere and maple syrup? Not on my watch.





another fun world food fact
Posted by jessie on May 10, 2007
in korea, they have hot dogs on a stick, covered in french fries! those crazy koreans!

http://www.flickr.com/photos/newley/95154937/in/set-72057594057350611/

Posted by Nerhael on May 10, 2007
It has a different sauce, and the meat is prepared differently, using bread, flour, and spices, instead of just meat.

At what point does a variation become something new enough for you to consider it something else? Most food is just a variation of something else.

I don't care how it's served, I'm talking it's basic constitution. If Canadian Pho or Pad Thai have substantially different ingredients, they should give them new names.

The purpose of naming conventions and archetypes are so people know that it's a familiar item. For instance, I get pissed off when I order a poutine and get shredded marbled or mozzarella cheese. That's not a god damned poutine, so use another label.

Isn't it more common for a restaurant that takes a different approach on a common meal to name it somewhat differently to cue people that it's not what you'd expect?

Posted by Nerhael on May 10, 2007
Also, I would like to point out I initially thought we were talking about 'danishes'. I forgot what a danish was, and really had no concept of what a donair was.

Posted by Miguel on May 10, 2007
Well now you're getting into a very tricky situation.

Take poutine for example....there are a baziliion different ways you can make it, and you can't really give a different name to each poutine variation as it would confuse people. It's still basically a poutine, just like pad thai is still basically the same thing.

I read the same wikipedia article as you about donairs, and the mere fact the typing "donairs" brings you to the original turkish page about donners leads me to think that the donair is just a weird variant of what has now become the hot dog of this new globalized world, the donner kebab.

Yes you can go to a separate page about the Halifaxian donairs, but they owe a large debt to the original turkish dish. Just like Jessie's unholy Korean hot dogs couldn't possibly look more different than our own, but are still basically the same idea.

Posted by Miguel on May 10, 2007
I would just like to point out how delighted I am that we are engaging in this totally useless conversation.

And that I used to always think Donairs were variations on an eclair.

Posted by phduffy on May 10, 2007
Well, I think you lose, because while Donners, or Donner Kebabs are Turkish, Donairs are not.

Posted by phduffy on May 10, 2007
I'd also like to point out that a donair is essentially a schwarma, but we don't consider them the same thing.

And in fact, in the middle east, a schwarma is beef, while what we'd call a chicken schwarma is actually called a Shish Taouk.

Posted by phduffy on May 10, 2007
And wait, isn't pizza a Chinese invention?

Is Bruschetta pizza?

No.

No it is not.

Posted by Nerhael on May 10, 2007
Donairs have fueled more controversy here than anything in the last several months.

Needs more Lohan Celebrity Snatch.

Posted by Palmer on May 10, 2007
"I'd also like to point out that a donair is essentially a schwarma, but we don't consider them the same thing."

No no no...now you're pushing the limit. While a schwarma and a donair (as we know it in Canada) may APPEAR to be the same thing, it is in fact...not. This is like comparing the donair to a breakfast burrito, or a chicken club wrap. You don't compare these items. While they all are enveloped in a tortilla goodness, there is a substantial difference between the two.

If one were to compare a schwarma to a donair, it would be like comparing a nude photo of Marilyn Monroe to a nude photo of Courtney Love *shudder*

Posted by Miguel on May 10, 2007
What the fuck are you talking about.


ITS MEAT ON A GODDAM PITA.

IT IS THE SAME IDEA, IT IS THE SAME THING. ONE STEMS FROM THE OTHER

"but miguel its a different kind of meat, and a different kind of sauce"

"but miguel one is called dohn-air the other is dohn-ehr"

STOP BEING SO FUCKING QUEER.


PERIOD.


DONAIRS ORIGINALLY CAME FROM TURKEY. I DONT CARE WHAT A JABRONIE FROM HALIFAX PUT ON IT OR HOW HE MADE IT DIFFERENTLY. ITS BASICALLY THE SAME FUCKING THING YOU CAN GET IN GERMANY OR IN ENGLAND.

AND ITS NOT A CANADIAN DISH.

Posted by Miguel on May 10, 2007
PIZZA IS NOT FUCKING CHINESE.

MAYBE PASTA IS IF YOU CONSIDER BASIC NOODLES PASTA.

I DONT. THE CHINKS AND EYETALS WENT IN VERY DIFFERENT DIRECTIONS WITH IT.



Posted by Miguel on May 10, 2007
PIZZA IS NOT FUCKING CHINESE.

MAYBE PASTA IS IF YOU CONSIDER BASIC NOODLES PASTA.

I DONT. THE CHINKS AND EYETALS WENT IN VERY DIFFERENT DIRECTIONS WITH IT.



Posted by crux on May 11, 2007
Dear Friends,

Miguel - I sincerely enjoy that you are quite possibly the only person left on the face of the planet who still uses the term "JABRONIE" on a very regular basis. Seriously, I mean it.

Jessie - that picture of the hot dog + french fry monstrosity scared me in ways I cannot describe. Also, apparently I'm not dying so there will be no party. Sorry.

Palmer - I feel that a comparison between a nude photo of Marilyn Monroe and a nude photo of Courtney Love is entirely fair because the bottom line is they're both Celebrity Snatch, and thus equal...from a certain point of view. Also, let's face it Celebrity Snatch is what The Wolfshack is all about.

Pete - I'd like to see the top key word searches bringing outsiders to The Wolfshack proudly displayed at the top of the interface and updated on a weekly if not daily basis.

Paul - Please send me more information on this international conspiracy to cover up the Chinese invention of pizza. I was blind to this concept before, but now I feel my eyes are wide open and I'm seeing the world clearly for the first time. Also, I would like to subscribe to your newsletter.

Bryan - I miss you baby.

In closing I would like to say that I am extremely bored at the moment as my IT department has utterly failed to provide me with a functional testing environment after almost two weeks of "work". If anyone has any software QA work that they need done right now, please send it my way.

Lovingly yours,
Seth

PS: Prior to this post I had never heard of a donair, and frankly all the controversy has spoiled them for me already. I'll just stick to my beef schwarma. It's pretty much exactly the same thing, right?

Posted by bryan on May 11, 2007
Ok. I'm going out on a eurocentric limb here...

The Earl of Sandwich created the first sandwich right? Meat on a grain? Donairs were invented in England.

What do I win?

Also, Bruschetta is in fact pizza. If pizza pizza can put shrimp and bbq sauce on a fucking flatbread and call it pizza, and if mcdonalds can sell soy patties with a sprinkle of beef in them and call them hamburgers, then we might as well not even have names for anything.

(Except in database tables, just for Pete).

Posted by cosmicfish on May 13, 2007
When I lived in Nova Scotia, they were like, "How the fuck do you not know what a donair is?"

And while I was stoned for a large percentage of my time there, I seem to remember the donairs there being more like a panzerotti.

Posted by Thrillhouse on May 16, 2007
I totally missed the boat on this, but isn't pizza in fact American (New Yorkian particularly)? I mean, I think it was Italians living in New York, but still.

Also, what's with the variation in spelling? Is it donner or donair? Frankly I think donair sounds better just because it doesn't conjure up the image of reindeer on a spittle.